“The band have been able to use their exposure for the greater good”, Debs Wild says – Coldplay Brasil
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“The band have been able to use their exposure for the greater good”, Debs Wild says

In an exclusive interview with Coldplay Brasil, Debs Wild talks about her trajectory with the band and her book Life in Technicolor: a celebration of Coldplay.

Texto Marcelo Monteiro
@mrclmonteiro

“Debs, without you, we would be nowhere,” said Chris Martin, Coldplay’s lead singer. In fact, Debs Wild is one of the most important people in the history of Coldplay. On September 14, 1998, she’s attended her first Coldplay gig, in Manchester, England. A special date for her, the band —and, of course, all of us, fans. After that, she introduced them to a record label and ensured their first contract with a label.

20 years later, she launches the book Life in Technicolor: a celebration of Coldplay, which brings never-seen-before interviews and photos. “I can’t wait for the next 20!”, commented Debs, on a Twitter post in which she celebrated the special date.

She told Coldplay Brasil about her career and her work with the band. “It’s been an incredible journey”, said. The book, scheduled for release on October 4, was also a subject. “I’ve had access to their friends’ photos and to the band’s personal archives so there are some real gems in there”, she said.


First of all, it’s an honor to be talking with you, specially now you’re preparing something so important as your book.

Thank you.

But it all started very long ago. How has been your journey with Coldplay since the very beginning?

It’s been an incredible 20-year journey. From seeing them play tiny venues in front of not very many people to selling out multiple nights in capacity full stadiums. Being a part of that has been so exciting.

You’ve been working with them for a long time —including the Oracle, which fans could ask about the band. How do you deal with all this responsibility?

When you work for people you love, you just try to do your best and not let them down. The only responsibility I have, is to protect them and try to represent them in the best way I can. It’s not a hardship; it’s a privilege.

And when did you first have the idea for the book?

I didn’t. I was approached to write it.

For the book, you teamed up with Malcom Croft. How did you come to him?

Again, I didn’t. He came to me. We met 10 years ago when he worked as a publisher. He almost published a book I was writing back then.

What can fans expect from the book?

The most amazing photos that have never been seen before. I’ve had access to their friends’ photos and to the band’s personal archives so there are some real gems in there. I particularly love Chapter Zero about the early years because the Internet wasn’t really around then. I interviewed lots of collaborators and people in the team, including Phil & Dave. I also went through my interviews with the band from the past, some of which had new quotes never published before. One thing that was really difficult was to try and condense 20 years into a certain number of pages. There was no way I could write about everything —even the best bits— which means so much was lost in the edit but it could have so easily been double the number of words!

To finish, something we ask to everyone we interview: do you believe that Coldplay songs can change the world? And which song do you believe has the most impact when it comes to this?

I don’t think they can, I know they can! I may reword it slightly to something I used to have emblazoned on a t-shirt, but to me it means the same thing —music changes lives. I receive emails on a daily basis from fans from all over the world. So many of those are telling me their stories of how Coldplay helped them through difficult situations but occasionally they will tell me how a song saved their life or helped them change their path. Many people have met and married because of a song. Some people have picked up an instrument or decided to write themselves after hearing the band’s music. I can’t single out just one song because it’s relative. Their existence has led to changes on a wider scale from their involvement with Make Trade Fair, Global Citizen Movement and many charities and causes. Music is powerful and the band have been able to use their exposure for the greater good. It’s a wonderful thing.